Business · Decisions · Motivation

Scared of doing something? Use the 10/10/10 rule for instant motivation.

I’m sitting outside of my in-laws’ house, enjoying the fresh air of a beautiful California evening, thinking and dreaming about the year ahead. As so many others have these last few weeks of the year, I’ve been busy setting personal and professional goals for the year.

I have a decision to make: either get over my fears and go for it, or settle for mediocrity.

One of these goals is an ambitious one to build my client base, specifically those clients who will provide recurring revenue streams for months, if not years…

…but building this client base will require quite a bit of outreach, and every time I think of it, I’m filled with dread.

Productivity

The One Productivity Hack that Always Gets Results

Forget the To-Do List: This List is More Important

The new year is just around the corner, and you know what that means: ads for gym memberships, healthy eating, and nicotine patches. It seems we all want to get in shape, eat healthier, and quit those bad habits.

For many, though, the new year won’t be about eliminating unhealthy habits from our lives, but more about increasing our productivity.

Maybe 2018 will be the year you finally write your book, launch that business, or accomplish those “life goals” you promised yourself you’d hit by the time you were forty.

The point is, we all have goals and ambitions. Whatever our next big project may be, the motivation is the same: be more productive so we can produce our best work.

Writing

Want to be a better writer? Stop putting out fires.

My wife and I live in Southern California, so the #1 topic of conversation right now is the wildfires that are devastating our state. It’s national news: hundred of homes destroyed, thousands evacuated, millions of dollars in damage.

Walk outside and there are tangible reminders everywhere: the smoke is thick and acrid – it burns your eyes and nose within seconds. Wake up in the morning and the sky is literally raining ash. The smoke is so thick you can stare at the sun as it casts eerie orange pall on everything around. Schools have been cancelled, people are staying home from work, everyone is wearing masks. Friends of ours are being evacuated, countless people have lost their homes…it’s a mess.

Writing

Write What You Know

A few years back, a friend of mine found himself in the office of Tim Keller, a popular pastor in New York City and a prolific author of numerous books on faith and work. He was there as one member of a team who was interviewing Tim as part of an upcoming film.

A pastor and scholar himself, my friend asked Tim a personal question after the interview had concluded: he had been entertaining thoughts of writing a book, but wondered how to package up all of the thoughts and lessons he’d learned over his 30-some years of life. He wondered how Tim Keller would do it – where would he start?

Keller’s response left him a bit disappointed, saying something to the effect of “Son, you can’t write a book – you’re only 30 years old. You don’t have anything to write about yet.